Poll: Americans Drink Less Beer, Turn Towards Wine And Liquor

Poll: Americans Drink Less Beer, Turn Towards Wine And Liquor

Americans are slowly turning away from beer as their alcoholic beverage of choice, a Gallup poll from July 2013 finds.

As the Atlantic reports, the last twenty years have seen a decline in the popularity of beer and an increase in the popularity of both liquor and wine among both black and white Americans.

Beer is not as popular among Americans as it was twenty years ago. A collection of rare beer cans. Beer Cans-1 By Visitor7 (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons; https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ABeer_Cans-1.jpg
Beer is not as popular among Americans as it was twenty years ago. A collection of rare beer cans. Beer Cans-1 By Visitor7 (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons; https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ABeer_Cans-1.jpg

Here are some of the Atlantic’s explanations for the trend:

  • A general higher awareness of healthy living.
  • The (white) working class is suffering from the economic crises in the early 2000s and since 2008.
  • Since the late 1990s, liquor ads have been shown on television.
  • Americans are discovering affordable and tasty wine while the exports of American wines are increasing.

Read more:

U.S. Drinkers Divide Between Beer and Wine as Favorite.” (Jeffrey M. Jones, Gallup, 2013/08/01)

Why Are American Drinkers Turning Against Beer?” (Derek Thompson, The Atlantic, 2013/08/05)

Visual History: Photographic Essays On 1970s America From Documerica

Visual history: Photographic essays on 1970s America from Documerica at The Atlantic

I recently discovered a fantastic series of photographic essays covering the 1970s in America over at Alan Taylor’s photography blog In Focus on the website of The Atlantic.

The material is originally from Documerica, a photojournalistic documentary project conducted by the EPA  between 1971 and 1977 that sought to “capture environmental problems, EPA activities, and everyday life in the 1970s.”

The photographic essays available on The Atlantic’s website so far portray life in different parts of the United States at the time, among them New York City, The Southwest, Chicago’s African-American communityTexas, and The Pacific Northwest.

It is great stuff for anyone interested in American history of the late twentieth century. I highly recommend taking a look!